NUDE ART MODEL AND BODY POSITIVIST, JAMIE ON NUDITY AS AN ART, FEMINISM, BODY ACCEPTANCE AND MORE

Jamie is a nude art model, a feminist and a body positive activist. She uses her platform and art to connect with herself and empowers other women who deal with self-hate and mental illness.

In our interview with her, she talks about always feeling like the odd one out and how she suffered through depression and life hurdles. She has learnt to love who she is while growing everyday. Being a nude art model made her realize how beautiful our bodies and how women need to embrace who they are, wear whatever they want and love themselves through and through.

Read our interview with her below

At what point did you start promoting body and self acceptance?

When I started modelling and seeing myself as art and not flawed.

It became more personal as people started seeing me as a person who accepted herself and that representation has helped others to find their own self acceptance.

 

What has the journey been like for you?

It’s been life changing because of the way I now see and accept myself. I’ve also given other plus size women the confidence to try nude art modelling.

Mostly, it’s brought me a greater sense of peace because I don’t fight or hate what I see in the mirror every day.

What do you consider as body positivity?

To me body positivity is acceptance and inclusion of ALL bodies. The diversity that the human form can come in is so beautiful and unique, it’s really something to celebrate!

What impact does mental health have in body acceptance and self-care? What role did this play in your journey?

For me mental health and getting myself to a better place in managing my depression has become such a big part of where I am now. People always want to bring up physical health and while you should exercise and be healthy, mental health needs to also be a top priority.

What is your story with body acceptance and self-care?

I’ve never felt like I fit in because I’m the only redhead in my family. I also hit puberty at a really young age and that was very isolating because no one else was going through those changes.
As a teenager, I was terribly depressed, and when my choir teacher told me I was too fat for Broadway, the self-loathing really set in.
I got my cosmetology license right out of high school. When I started doing hair, I loved making people feel good about themselves it was the best part of the experience for me. When I started modelling and seeing the artwork done of my body I saw myself as a work of art, and not something flawed. It was such a turning point for me because I definitely love myself more at this point in my life than I ever have.

The society and our culture has ridiculed women who embrace their bodies. Women tend to feel disappointed when the feel they have ‘fallen short’ of the ideal body shape or being the ‘ideal woman.’ From pressures on body image stereotype, to inequality in jobs, relationships and day to day life. This  also affects mental health. How can women combat patriarchy and misogyny and live the lives they want ? What has been your journey on this and how are you getting by and thriving?

Well it’s about damn time we stop thinking of this idea of “perfection“ because no human will ever be perfect; humans are flawed. This idea of “ideal body shape” is a concept that changes through history so in reality there’s no such thing; it’s a totally made up concept. We really need to move away from any idea of “good body “or “bad body “when in reality we should treat people and their bodies with respect. Finding my own self love is something that helped me to not pass judgement on to other people.

When did you start being a nude art model and what significance does it play in your message and purpose towards feminism and empowerment?

I started modelling about two years ago in Palm Springs California. After modelling for my first class and seeing the artwork, I had a total shift in how I saw my body. In an art class having curves is highly sought after, those curves become an asset to the artists. It’s completely changed how I see myself, I finally started to see myself and my body as something desirable, unique and special. It’s a feeling that I want to pass on to other people to feel empowered by their body instead of ashamed of it.

Our culture has over the years encouraged slut and body shamers. Nudity for women is seen as something that is appalling and ‘not ideal’, a lot of women are scared to embrace what they really want to do? I tend to see nudity as a beautiful thing and the female body being a work of art. I believe women are to explore and embrace their bodies and also clothes are overrated.. *laughs*. I think that the stigma our culture has placed on nudity in respect to women, is one of the problems with inequality. What are your thoughts on these and how can women who struggle with this find peace and liberation from dogmas.

What roles do you think this mindset on nudity has played with gender inequality, rape and sexual harassment?
I completely agree with you! The biggest problem is how some women have been made to feel ashamed of their bodies basically their whole life. This is something men literally never face and it’s a total double standard. When it comes down to it though wear what you want! Don’t let someone try to dictate or shame what you choose to put on your body. Wear whatever makes you feel good! We also need to continue to teach everyone that whatever you have on your body is not an invitation for disrespect.

For the women struggling to embrace nudity, femininity, authenticity and who they are. What advice will you give from your experience, hurdles and lessons?

Well, I’m always encouraging women I meet to try posing for an art class so they can see themselves as the works of art that they are! Although most shy away from it, I do try to get them to at least see themselves naked, in the mirror with all the lights on and just admire their body. This body carries you through life, it’s part of who you are, so why be at war with yourself? I also encourage you to look inward, people are so obsessed with physical beauty when in reality who you are on the inside and how you treat others is so much more valuable.

You are defying stereotypes. It’s amazing. How do you handle criticisms and negativity from outsiders and insiders?

Thank you so much! I’ve come to learn that most people’s negativity comes from their own self hate and not by me living my life. Anytime I encounter negativity or harsh words I’m more saddened at the fact that someone has so much hate inside they take it out on other people. In those moments, I hope those people can find inner peace with themselves and stop the cycle of hate.
1 Comment
  1. Good for you, Girl! Take care of yourself, love yourself, and bask in the good stuff the world has to offer.

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